The Campaign to Preserve the Sacred Artifacts of the Life and Work of The Divine World-Teacher Adi Da Samraj

Adi Da Samraj is Always Present

My service in Sacred Archives is cleaning and scanning 35 mm slides in the process of digitizing them for archival preservation. Because I have to examine each slide closely, I see every image very clearly. Most of the slides capture a moment in Bhagavan Adi Da’s life. I fell deeply in love with Adi Da Samraj during His Lifetime. He said He would remain fully available following His death by means of the sighting of His Murtis (photographic or other artistic representations of His Body). All His devotees have found this to be absolutely, miraculously so. Thus, much of the time I serve in Adidam Sacred Archives is a time of deep contemplation of my Beloved Master. Sometimes I am overwhelmed with love, and there are tears of joy and gratitude, because I feel Him intimately Present, not the least bit ‘dead and gone’. I’m entirely grateful to serve Adi Da’s...

What are Checksums? Why we use them

A checksum is a digit representing the sum of the correct digits in a piece of stored or transmitted digital data, against which later comparisons can be made to detect errors in the data. The process of digitizing archival materials (video tape, audio tape, photographs, scanned manuscripts, etc.) produces thousands of files of various sizes and formats. It is important that each of these files is preserved perfectly, digit by digit, bit by bit, byte by byte. Any change that takes place, even in a single byte, constitutes possible corruption of the original. And this corruption can and does happen over time. Just as with physical objects, digital objects can deteriorate or “rot”. So, it is very important that we find a way to track any change or corruption that may occur. And if corruption is detected the file or digital data needs to be restored to its original form. Utilizing checksums makes tracking data changes possible We have developed a program that calculates a checksum for each of the files stored in the Sacred Archives. These checksums are saved in the Archives Database system. Once a year the program is run on the files, calculating the checksum at that time. If a file has changed, even by one byte, over that year the newly calculated checksum will be different than the original checksum retrieved from the Archives Database for that file. Since every file is backed up in triplicate on digital tapes, if any file corruption is detected by comparing checksums, a copy can be restored from tape. The checksum for the restored copy can also calculated, and if it is the...

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